Episode 16: Towards A More Inclusive Outdoors

What We Can Do

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Banner image by Liz Song

Diversity, equity, and inclusion in the outdoors: Part 2.

Communication, activism, and reflection. In the second part of our series on diversity, equity, and inclusion in the outdoors, we talk with experts to provide practical steps for how organizations AND individuals can cultivate a more inclusive outdoor space. Liz Song of Snowqueen and Scout cohosts with Gale Straub on this special two part series.

Listen to part one here ->

Our tips in the episode, summarized:

  1.  Reflect. Take time to dig deeper within yourself. Consider your heritage. Think about who you are, your experiences, and how your background colors your experiences in the outdoors. What might your unconscious biases be? What do you bring to the table?
  2. Get curious. Ask questions to understand where someone’s coming from. How might you hold an open posture in having conversations with people who are different from you?
  3. Support organizations on the front lines of diversity, equity, and inclusion work. Give money to non-profits like Outdoor Afro, Out There Adventures and Latino Outdoors. They need funding to do the important work they’re doing.
  4. Follow these orgs on social media and help amplify the work they’re doing. It’s simple and anyone can do it with a click of a button. Like Graciela mentioned earlier, we can’t just wait for companies to change the face of who’s represented in media. We, those who are on the ground, can amplify other people’s voices. Whether you have a large following or not, use your influence to not just amplify your voice or your experience, but use it to share others’ who might not get as much air time. On a personal level, we have been thinking differently about who to feature on She Explores – online and on this podcast.
  5. Encourage companies to be more inclusive in their media representation. You can comment on their imagery, write letters, and voice your concern with companies to include a wider variety of people in their media. Yes, you totally can. Businesses want to please their customers and they will hear you.

We’d also love for you to reflect and share your thoughts with us on any aspect of this podcast that struck you. It’s been an important journey for both of us to contribute to this conversation in an industry we love, and if there are ways we can support this dialogue to continue, we’d like to hear it. 

This episode features:

Aparna Rajagopal-Durbin & Ava Holliday, The Avarna Group co-founders.

Graciela Cabello, Latino Outdoors National Director.

Miho Aida, “If She Can Do It, You Can Too.”

Elyse Rylander, Founder of Out There Adventures.

You can find the lovely excerpt from Teresa Baker’s blog here.

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Music is by MindsEye, Dr. Rinkel & Mise via freemusicarchive.org

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Some Of The Women Featured, In Action:

Graciela Cabello, Latino Outdoors
Graciela Cabello, Latino Outdoors
Aparna Rajagopal-Durbin by James Mills, The Avarna Group
Aparna Rajagopal-Durbin by James Mills, The Avarna Group
Elyse Rylander, Out There Adventures
Elyse Rylander, Out There Adventures
Ava Holliday by Matt Pool Photography, The Avarna Group
Ava Holliday by Matt Pool Photography, The Avarna Group
Miho Aida
Miho Aida

Resources:

It Matters Who You See in Outdoor Media“, Outside Magazine, by Carolyn Finney

For People of Color, Hiking Isn’t Always an Escape,” USA Today, by Benjamin Spillman

Episode 2: Being ‘Outdoorsy’ When You’re Black or Brown,” Code Switch Podcast

More Minorities are Hiking and Camping – Good News for Makers of Outdoorsy Gear,” LA Times, by Hugo Martin

Diversity on the Trail is a Gift and Here’s Why,” Brown Gal Trekker

Why Don’t They Look Like Me? The Diversity Dilemma in Outdoor Media,” Little Grunts

What unique experiences do you bring to the trail?